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How to Make Coffee with An Automatic Espresso Machines

How to Make Coffee with An Automatic Espresso Machines

How to Make Coffee with An Automatic Espresso MachinesIf a fully automatic machine is more to your liking, especially to prevent the messy spilling of coffee grounds on the counter and measuring the perfect amount to use every single time, there are a few things you have to know beforehand. First of all, know that the process behind the coffee making remains the same, it’s all just automated and requires no human help (apart from filling it with water and coffee). Secondly, while making coffee the machine takes care of everything, you will have to be in charge of cleaning each component up as a dirty machine will produce a rancid tasting brew and a foul odor even when not in use; not to mention that a dirty machine will last you less.

Having said that, preparing the machine is simple, regardless of the model you may have. Most likely you will have one of those machines which only need roasted coffee beans: these only require you to pour the beans in the container, and make sure that water is still present in the compartment. You press the button, after fiddling with the control panel to adjust your espresso’s strength (and other options on some machines), and voila’. Your little mug will be filled in minutes – the machine taking care of grinding the beans, measuring the right amount of both water and fresh grounds, heating the water to the perfect temperature, and pouring it in your cup when it’s done brewing.

Also Check – How to Make Coffee with a Coffee Press

As for the cleaning, the task can be tedious, but fortunately it isn’t an everyday occurrence. Daily maintenance includes wiping the exterior with a moist cloth or perhaps using a spray cleaner where harder stains are present. The interior parts are what get really dirty after use, and need to be cleaned every week or after about 25 shots. This because freshly ground beans contain the most amount of the oils and essences that make up the coffee’s aroma and flavor, and when these oils are fresh they tend to stick on to all kinds of surfaces: especially the inner metal parts of your machine. Modern machines now have easy-to-remove compartments for easy cleaning, which facilitates the removal of the various parts (and the once-harder process of putting everything back together afterwards). First and foremost, turn off your machine and unplug it, to cool it down and avoid injuries. After removing each part, I recommend soaking them in warm water and vinegar for an hour or so before washing and scrubbing them with a backflush detergent (like Cafiza or PuroCaf). Then rinse everything thoroughly (you don’t want soap ruining the taste of the coffee) and then wipe each part dry with a towel so most hard-water impurities are reduced; carefully then place everything in its right place.

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